Demystifying German Knitting Charts

Orient - Puntasam

Orient – Puntasam

With half of my ancestry being Norwegian, I own quite a few printed-in-English books with Norwegian patterns and even one book in Norwegian. The books really do not have “recipe” based instructions which we knitters in the US seem to rely on. I’ve notice the German sock patterns I’ve been translating have the same type of instructions; example for a sock cuff, K1, P1 until length you want.  Or for the heel: Knit the heel the way you like on 30 stitches. I don’t remember every seeing my mom use a knitting pattern. She just measured us and knit-to-fit. Elizabeth Zimmerman’s books are a good example of using math in order to make knits fit the way mom did.

Another noticeable feature in the German sock patterns, is that each pattern developer seems to use her own special symbols to represent stitches on the knitting charts. Each chart did come with a key which is easily translated into US knitting terms. If you read yesterday’s blog you can probably figure this out for yourself. All the sock patterns came from Sockenmusterthread der Zweite

This is the English translation for the above key for the Orient socks chart by Puntasam.

rechte Masche = Knit stitch (K)

Umschlag = Yarn over (YO)

zwei Maschen rechts zusammen stricken = Knit two stitches together (K2tog)

Froschkoenig

Froschkoenig key

Froschkoenig key

Rechts verschränkt = Knit through back loop

linke Masche = Purl

einfache Abnahme = Slip slip knit (ssk)

rechte Masche = Knit

Zopf 3 Maschen hinter die Arbeit legen = Cable 3 stitches held behind the work

Zopf 3 Maschen vor die Arbeit legen = Cable 3 stitches held in front of the work

Umschlag = yarn over

zwei Maschen rechts zusammen stricken = knit 2 together

Sunshine by Puntasam

Sunshine

Sunshine by Puntasam

linke Masche = Purl

Umschlag = Yarn over (YO)

zwei Maschen rechts zusammen stricken = knit 2 together (Note the different symbols in Sunshine and Froschkoenig for this stitch)

Treibgutwellen by Puntasam

Remember I mentioned that there are lots of compound words in German? The title of these socks intrigued me so I pasted it into Google translate and came up with “Treigutwellen”. Hum….. I could see three distinct words in the title so I added spaces and did these words: Trieb gut wellen which literally translate to “waves drive good”.  The socks have a wave pattern so this name fits.

Triebgutwellen by Puntasam

Triebgutwellen by Puntasam

1 Masche rechts 1 Umschlag wobei bei den geraden Runden die Umschläge rechts ver- schränkt gestrickt werden, damit keine Löcher entstehen. = YO, Knit 1 through back loop. Good video here it’s in German but the video is easy to follow.

rechte Masche = Knit

zwei Maschen rechts zusammen stricken = knit 2 together

1 überzogene Abnahme (1 Masche rechts abheben 1 Masche rechts stricken und die abgehobene Masche darüber ziehen) = skp (slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over)

linke Masche = Purl

These are just four of the sock chart keys. For any of the charts in German, just print them out and add the English translation by the key. If your more comfortable with our traditional symbols, re-write the chart. I’ve also found another German – English Dictionary of Knitting which I really like since it is on one page and translates  400 German knitting words and phrases. Do not be intimidated by the language!

I’ve been lusting after a pattern written in Finnish, land of my pre-1600, maternal ancestors. That will be a task to translate, because the language is not familiar to those of us whose language is of Indo-European origin: English, German, French, Spanish, etc. Finnish is a member of the Uralic language family, along with Estonian. At least when I saw the German word  “gut” I knew it was translated as “good”.  In Finnish good is “hyvä”, not at all familiar. Wish me luck!

QThanks for stopping by. Now go have a crafty day.

It’s All About The Socks in German

 

Frischer Kaffee by Sylvia

Frischer Kaffee by Sylvia Regenberg

You must, must, must visit Sylvia Regenberg on her Fido blog (after you read this one). See those beautiful socks pictured above, knit using Online stretch? Sylvia knitted the sock and then posted this picture on Addicted to Knitting Socks FB page. I was in love! The pattern, the colors! Yikes! I followed her link to a free pattern on Ravely called Frischer Kaffee (Fresh Coffee). After downloading the pattern, I clicked on another link and was lead to a German sock pattern forum. There are so MANY beautiful, fabulous free sock patterns that it makes my head spin!! Really! No, I cannot read German, however I did not let that stop me from figuring out the patterns.  Copy and paste the pdf text into Google Translate to get the general idea. Knitting Fool has the best knitting terms translated into English site. It also works the opposite way, if you are a German speaker, you can click on German to see the English terms. Always remember that the German language loves compound words! Frequently two are more words are combined together to make one long word. These are the languages available:

Knitting Terms Translated

Knitting Terms Translated from Knitting Fool

Sorry, if you’re hoping I’ll translate a whole pattern for you, not gonna happen. Retired or not, I will always be a teacher. 8-) I’m working on a pair of socks right now and will use the measurements for those socks in this post. This post is with the assumption that you, dear reader, are familiar with the basic design for knitting socks, this one is cuff down. Just recognizing a few terms can help you figure out the pattern without “reading” all of the words. For the socks I tended to like, it was the different legs that I was interested in. You can knit your own cuff, heel, foot and toe. Also remember, that translations from any language cannot be “exact” since sentence construction is individual to each language. Here are some general terms:

Stricken = knit

gestrickt = knitted

krause masche = purl stitch

glatt rechts = stockinette

Maschenanschlag 59 Maschen = Cast on 59 stitches

  • Maschenanschlag = cast on
  • Maschen = stitches
  • Masche = stitch

pro Nadel = per Needle

  • Nadel 1 = Needle 1  – see how many stitches on needle 1, etc for Nadel 2, Nadel 3, and Nadel 4. (Or, use two circular needles as I do, and cast 29 stitches on each needle)

Bündchen die Maschen or Bündchenmuster = Rib stitches

runden = rounds/row

Schaft = leg

10 Runden Bündchenmuster habe ich den Schaft angefangen. ” = Knit 10 rounds of rib then start the leg, see how you only need to recognize a few words?

Schaftlänge (Shaft length) = Leg length

Mustersatz 1 für erste (1st) und dritte (3rd) Nadel = Chart for 1st and 3rd needle
Mustersatz 2 für zweite (2nd) und vierte (4th) Nadel = Chart for the 2nd and 4th needle

  • Mustersatz = chart

Note: Since I use two circulars, I just combine 1st needle and 2nd needle on one circular and 3rd and 4th needle on the second.

29 Maschen für die Ferse = 29 Stitches for the heel

  • Ferse = heel
  • Bumerangferse = Heel row

So, work the heel on 29 stitches. Use your favorite heel pattern or, if there is a chart, use that.  Most sock knitters have a heel they like. Knit your favorite gusset, then knit the foot to the toe. If the pattern pattern continues on the top to the toe, continue the pattern.

Tomorrow I’ll cover the charts. They do not seem to have a “universal knitting chart language” as the US does.

QThanks for stopping by. Have a wonderful crafty day.

Having Fun With An Amazon Gift Card

Done

Background for page is done

Ha Ha, you probably thought I was going to show wonderful goodies that I purchased with the gift card. Nope!  This card was used quite awhile ago, so I repurposed it! I don’t like blank journal pages. It was time to put the card to use making a new page background. This is the “Hide a Secret Message Somewhere In The Book”. This page isn’t done, I just added a background.

dots

Add paint dots randomly to the blank page

 

Start smearing with the side of a plastic card

Start smearing with the side of a plastic card

In A Pickle With Earl and Opal

Timeless Treasures Material Girl Panel

Timeless Treasures Material Girl Panel

Who doesn’t look forward to the Sunday funnies with Earl and Opal? Starts our week off with a good, hearty, laugh. My Hubs likens himself to the “long suffering” Earl!

Timeless Treasures Material Girl Pickles

Timeless Treasures Material Girl Pickles

Timeless Treasures Pickles Cartoon Material Girl Comic Strip

Timeless Treasures Pickles Cartoon Material Girl Comic Strip

Laura from SewVeryEasy blog's panel quilt

Laura from SewVeryEasy blog’s panel quilt

At the Timeless Treasures site, is a fabulous quilt by Laura of SewVeryEasy blog, with a How to use Fabric Panels to Make Quilts link to YouTube. I am in love with her use of selvedges in the border. Super clever. The video tutorial show how.

QThanks for stopping by. Now go have a crafty day!

Tap, Tap, Tap and Design A Quilt

I Spy !

I Spy !

I Spy 2

I Spy 2

I’ve discovered the Quiltography app for my iPad and I’m in love. With this app, the most I’ve ever spent for any app, I am able to quickly design and create quilts. Both of the I Spy quilts above were designed using the app. The Enchanted Pond quilt, in My Quilts below, was designed on November’s plane ride back to San Diego from Honolulu. I had the fabric loaded into the app and just played around trying different blocks, different quilt layouts, etc. Kept me occupied and busy for many fun hours, the trip takes 5 1/2 – 6 1/2 hours depending on the wind direction.

The below three pictures are the main screens; the welcome screen, the second screen swipe, and the third screen swipe. I’ll be going from left to right through the screens, capturing projects and showing what each item is.

Welcome Screen

Welcome Screen

Swipe to second screen

Swipe to second screen

Swipe to third screen

Swipe to third screen

Welcome Screen:

First column – My Stuff 

My Stash:

My Stash

My Stash

Some of the fabrics in My Stash. You can see that I have 209 fabrics in the stash. The ones in this picture are Enchanted Pond by Moda. Curls has a fabulous quilt top made from these fabrics and they are so totally my colors that I was green with envy and had to order a Layer Cake too.

My Blocks:

My Blocks

My Blocks

Just a SMALL sample of the 210 blocks I’ve created. You can see my latest, three blocks in the top left. The other blocks are for I Spy quilts, with just a hint of the Enchanted Pond in the bottom right.

My Quilts:

My Quilts

My Quilts

These are some of the quilts which I’ve designed. Super easy and fun to design.

My photoQuilts

Doots PDF

Doots PDF

My photoQuilt is awesome. Chose a picture and the app will quickly change it into a quilt pattern, showing all of the colors needed. Then save as a PDF which gives page-by-page instructions for creating the quilt. This is one of my daughters.

Second Column – Block Template:

Block template designer

Block template designer

Now you can create your own block templates from scratch. Pick a shape to add it to the grid, it positions itself ready to be resized, rotated and flipped into place.  I’ve used the template block designer both to create something unique and to replicate a blocks I love. You get to name your custom-made blocks. The one drawback is that the app does not allow the rotation of the shape to the exact degree I want.  I wanted to place a square at a 60 degree angle and could not.

Third Column – Fabric

Add Fabric

Add Fabric

This is the add fabric screen.  You can take pictures of your stash, or, which I did for Enchanted Pond, grab online pictures of the fabric from the manufacturer.  What pictures are in my stash you ask? The Enchanted Pond fabrics by Moda, about 100 I Spy fabrics, colorful prints for the I Spy blocks and my new Kiss Kiss fabrics by Moda for the latest blocks. Hey! I’m beginning to sound as a Moda rep! Hum….. You are able to record how much you have, where you got it from, when you purchased it and even how much it cost. The program even scans the fabric and picks out the top five colors to automatically tag the fabric, see where it has spots for Color 1 – Color 5? The app fills that in for you. So if I want to search my stash for “Blue” fabric, all of the tagged blue fabrics show up. Nifty!

Second Screen

First Column –  Block

Stock Template blocks

Stock Template Blocks

Custom Template Blocks

Custom Template Blocks

Use the stock blocks or design your very own custom block! See the custom blocks which I have designed? The modern star is based on a block I saw by LaineyBug Designs and Red Pepper Quilts was seen at their site. Click on the + tab on the Template Block Screen, upper right, to get to the Template Designer.

Second Column – Quilt

Quilt Design

Quilt Design

Now that you’ve added your fabric and designed your blocks, it’s time to create your quilt. I found the app so easy to use, that I was able to design the quilts quickly.  Search through the blocks you have previously created, or maybe new ones designed specifically for this new quilt. Enter the number of rows and columns needed for your quilt. Add a border around your quilt if so desired.

The app allows you to adjust the sashing width, add cornerstones, and flip and rotate blocks. The quilt design tool also allows you to link matching blocks, this saves you time and lets you change multiple blocks instantly. Which is a tool I’ve used many times. Just tap and highlight the squares to be changed on the quilt, then tap the block that’s to be place in the squares. This app is all about the tap, tap, tap! Tap on a quilt square, then tap on the block on the right and voila! The block is placed into the quilt. Also, notice the ? – you can click on that anytime in any screen and it takes you through a guided tutorial on how to use that function. Super great!!

A yardage calculator was added in the latest update! Hurray, the designer of the app really listens to what quilters want/need. When you’ve designed the quilt, click on the circular button under “NEW” towards the bottom right. The yardage calculator screen pops up.

Yardage Calculator

Yardage Calculator

 Third Column – photoQuilt

Doots photoQuilt

Doots photoQuilt

Have you ever wanted to turn a photo into a quilt? This is so totally easy. Click on the photoQuilt button, select the picture and it’s done. The photo is now a quilt with all of the colors needed. Click on the PDF button and the app makes an instructional PDF for you. No fuss, no muss! A photo quilt pattern in under a minute!

I’m not going to discuss the third screen. It’s all of the “other stuff”. BTW, I’m not being paid, or bribed, or otherwise coerced to write this review. I just LOVE the app. So the next time you wait at soccer practice for you child, in the dentists office, fly, etc create a quilt!

QThanks for stopping by. Now go have a crafty day.

FO: Tidal Wave Socks

Tidal Wave_

Tidal Wave Socks by Deby Lake

 

Tidal Wave and Shoes

Tidal Wave and shoes

Love, love, love the way these socks fit! Softer that soft! No judging! But….. I actually blogged about starting these socks on July 15, 2012, This Sock Pattern Is Much Better! Yarn? Debbie Macomber Petals, (merino, angora, and nylon). Pattern? Tidal Wave Socks by Deby Lake. WIP finished = check!

QThanks for stopping by for a visit. Now go have a crafty day.

Brushes Need A Lovely Holder Too

Finished brush holder, flap up

Finished brush holder, flap up

Sewing Tip: A make-up brush set it the BEST lint cleaners for your sewing machine and overlock machine. The little brushes get into the tiniest of spots. Thanks to theDealyo for the heads up on a inexpensive, free shipping site for the brushes. I bought two sets, one for Curls and one for me. Using the cheesy brush holder, which the bushes came in, as a template I designed a holder out of fabric from my stash.

Materials:

  • Three fabrics
  • Pellon iron-on interfacting
  • Ribbon for ties
  • Normal sewing supplies; machine, rulers, etc

Cut:

Main fabric:

  • 2 – 10″ x 7 1/2″  – For back and inside
  • 1 – 7″ x 6 1/2″ – Flap, Fold lengthwise
  • 1 – 7 1/2 ” x 9 1/2 – Pocket – Fold lengthwise

Iron-on Interfacing:

  • 1 – 10″ x 7 1/2 ” – Line main fabric
  • 1 – 3 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ – line 1/2 of flap
  • 1 – 3 ” x 9 1/2″ – line 1/2 of pocket

Seam allowance: Use 1/4″ seam allowance.

Placement and Measurements:

Placements and measurements

Placements and measurements

Steps:

1. Iron the interfacings to the one piece of the main fabric; the top-half flap fabric; and the top-half pocket fabric. (Sorry I did not photograph this step)

2. Sew the side seams of both the flap piece and the pocket piece together right-sides-facing. Trim the corners and turn right sides out. Press. Top stitch both the flap and the pocket pieces.

Sew the flap and pocket pieces

Sew the flap and pocket pieces

3. Using the following measurements, place the flap onto the interfaced main fabric. Use a stay-stitch to hold the flap in place.

Flap placement

Flap placement

4. Use a running stitch on the left side of the pocket to hold it in place.

Running Stitch to hold pieces down

Running Stitch to hold pieces down

5. Line up the right side of the pocket so it is inline with the right side of the flap. Sew the right side of the pocket down. There will be a gap of fabric which you will be pleating.

Tack down pockets

Sew down right side of pocket

6. Using about an 1/8″ pleat make 7 pockets. I pinned the edge to itself until they all fit. I sewed one pocket at a time, starting at the far left pocket.

Flap and pocket placement

Flap and pocket placement

7. After cutting the ribbon, I cut one end of each ribbon at a 45 degree angle and used Fray Check on them so they would not fray. After the ribbon ends dried, I lined the uncut ends up with the right edge of the main fabric at the 1/2 way mark and sewed down.

Ribbon attachment

Ribbon attachment

8. Put the outside fabric on top, right sides together. Making a brush holder “sandwich”. Making sure the “hanging” ribbons are not going to be caught in the seam. Sew sandwich together using a 1/4″ seam, and leaving a least a 2″ opening to put the fabric right side out. Double stitch on either side of the opening. Trim the corners, pull the fabric right side out and PRESS!

Sandwich the layers

Sandwich the layers

9. Add brushes and admire your handiwork. Here it is with the flap down. Since this was Curls’ gift, I didn’t take the cellophane off of the brushes.

Finished holder flap down

Finished holder flap down

Brush holder folded up and ready to go on a sewing trip with the machine!

Finished, folded and tied brush holder

Finished, folded and tied brush holder

QThanks for stopping by for a visit. Now, go have a crafty day!