Counting With a Jellyfish

Jellyfish Counting Game

Jellyfish Counting Game

First quiet book page done: Counting Jellyfish. I free-handed the shape of the jellyfish. I stitched around it twice since there will be plenty of tugging on the “tentacles” and beads. I purchased the “ribbon” at Michael’s close-out last year. The pony beads were from the Dollar Store. Every jellyfish needs fish so I ironed a fusible web onto the Riley Blake fish fabric and then onto the felt. For texture, I glued small bead/glitter to the top of the jelly. The page size is 9″ x 9″.

q8Have a fun crafty day!

Caterpillar Crazies!

Caterpillar Crazies

Caterpillar Crazies

With two toddlers in the family, I’m going crazy making felt crafts for them. The above Caterpillar Crazies is the latest. The idea was found at Toddler Approved! However, I had to pump it up and added the different mouth choices and the different sized pompoms. With the pompoms your toddler can also match colors, so its also a learning game. I had some wonderful textures which I added as additional choices. I totally love textures! A tactic person am I! The three-year-old is visiting today and I can’t wait for him to play with the caterpillar.

I’ve been working on some quiet book pages too. I have post-concussion syndrome and have had to give up knitting for a bit since I kept making too many mistakes. Frustrating. I never know when the dizzy spells will hit.

QHave a happy crafty day!

Can You Find The Matching Pairs?

Matching Game

Matching Game

animal_match

Animal Matching Game

With two rambunctious toddlers in the family, I’ve been trying to come up with ideas for games that will easily fit into Altoid tins for the moms to throw into purses. This is the latest tin. While perusing the 99 Cent Store for bargains, I saw these erasers and knew they would make a wonderful matching game. Having had one of the toddlers for the last couple of days, we have had fun playing this game. Just turn the erasers over and let the little one find the matching pairs.

I have made two other Purse Games which I’ve featured in the blog.

Angry Birds Buttoning Game

Angry Birds Buttoning Game

fishing

Fishing Game

There are metal washers inside of the fish, and the fishing pole has a strong magnet attached to the end. The Hubs cut a pencil in half for the fishing pole, it fits nicely into the tin. The youngest loves to play this game while waiting at soccer practice for his older siblings. Another toddler tried to use the game and was told “NO” by my little guy.

QHave a crafty, fun day!

The Unusual Balbriggan Heel

1897 Sears Roebuck & Co. Catalogue

1897 Sears Roebuck & Co. Catalogue

Yesterday’s Soldiers’ Socks, mentioned a Ballbriggan heel so casually I figured that 100 years ago it was a commonly known type of heel. Research is in order.

Balbriggan – Named for the town of Ballbriggan, Ireland, in 1843. Was first applies to full-fashioned hosiery made from unbleached cotton. About 1860 the name was applied to knit underwear of the same material. Originally it was used only on high-class goods, but it now covers everything in light-weight flat underwear mad of yarn, stained to the shade of Egyptian cotton. ~ Southern Merchant, Volume 20, 1907

Balbriggan Harbour Socks by Archives and Old Lace

Balbriggan Harbour Socks by Archives and Old Lace

Balbriggan Harbour Socks by Archives and Old Lace. This is a free pattern and the blog post is a fun read! All the research I’ve found about this heel, everyone has glowing words about how much fun the heel is to knit. For those of you who have Nancy Bush’s Folk Socks book or the Sock Architecture book, the pattern is in the books.

Detailed instructions for knitting the heel are found at Liberty’s Yarn blog.

This heel is definitely on my list of “must try”.  Go do a search and see all of the lovely examples.

QNow go have a fun crafty day!

Soldiers’ Socks: Heel-Flaps and Heels


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Published Feb. 9, 1916 in the The Sydney Mail.

Just at the present time the lives of the majority of women are bounded by knitting.  Every worker asks the other how many stitches the casts on for the top of the sock, what sized needles she uses, and the class of wool she prefers. When all this has been satisfactorily explained, the question of heels and toes comes uppermost. One woman swears by the Dutch heel, another by the common or square heel, and a third by the Swiss heel. It is wonderful how many ways there are of turning a heel, and how excited the novice feels when she has negotiated the corners, as it were, with success. Every woman can cast-on and knit round and round for the leg, but the heel is quite another matter. Each worker should acquaint herself with several methods. It is a pity to be tied down to any one style, and after all there is a certain amount of variety even in a small change like this. There are many kinds of excellent heels, some being suited to one kind of foot, others to another. Amongst the number may be mentioned the Dutch or horseshoe heel (to the writer’s idea one of the very best), the French, or round gusset heel, the manufacturers heel, the Balbriggan heel, the square heel, the Swiss, the Welsh, and the Niantic. The last named is to be seen on the majority of machine-knit hosiery; but as it has no gusset it is not as elastic as the other kinds.

The general rule for heels is that when the ankle is reached the stitches are evenly divided, half being used to work on for the heel, the other half left for the instep. But as there are always exceptions each variety of heal will be dealt with in turn. For the Dutch heel the stitches are divided as above. Knit to the seam stitch, purl it, and then knit along for a quarter of the number of stitches on the needles; turn, slip1, and then purl back to the seam stitch; knit this, and then purl for another quarter of the stitches. This will give the exact half for the heel flap, with the seam stitch in the center. The worker must now knit as many rows as there are stitches, as the flap is square. To turn the heel knit to the seam stitch, purl this, and knit 5 more. Take 2 together, and turn. Slip 1, purl to the seam stitch, knit this, purl 5, purl 2 together. Continue these two rows thus until the whole of the stitches are knitted off, and 14 stitches remain for the top of the heel.  

The French heel is eminently suited to the high instep. For this proceed in exactly the same way for the flap as just described for the Dutch heel; but the “turning” is different. Slip the first stitch, knit plain to the seam stitch, purl this, and then knit 1 stitch more, knit 2 together, and knit 1; turn, slip the first stitch, purl 4, purl 2 together, purl 1; turn, slip 1, knit 5 (the seam stitch is now abandoned), knit 2 together, knit 1; turn, slip1, purl 5, purl 2 together, purl 1; turn and continue, knitting 1 stitch more each time so that the heel widens out as the work proceeds, and all the stitches are knitted in. The last row will be a purled one. Knit across, and pick up for the gusset in the usual way. The square heel also requires half the number of stitches, with the seam stitch in the centre. This stitch is then abandoned, and work must be proceeded with (one purl and one plain row) until about three inches of flap are completed. The stitches must be then cast off, and the cast off stitches sewn neatly together. This of course, makes a seam in the middle of the heel; but it should not be uncomfortable if properly sewn. At the same time, this heel is not general for soldiers’ wear, but it is simple to accomplish. The wool is then joined on from the right hand corner of the instep needle. For the manufacturer’s heel proceed in exactly the same fashion, but knit as many rows as there are stitches. Then proceed to shape the flap. Knit to within three stitches of the centre, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, and plain to the end. Purl back. Repeat these two rows four times, when cast off and se up. The gusset stitches would be picked up as previously described.

There is a little variety with regard to the Welsh heel. Again half the number of stitches must be arranged on one needle, with the seam stitch in the center, the heel flap consisting once more of as many rows as there are stitches. Then slip 1, knit to within 10 stitches of the seam stitch, then *wool over the needle to make 1, knit 2 together, knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 1, purl the seam stitch, knit 1, knit 2 together; turn, wool over the needle to make 1, then purl to 10 stitches past the seam stitch; turn and repeat for * until all the side stitches are knitted in. Do not make a stitch in the last purl row. There should be 17 stitches when the work is completed. Later on some hints will be given on the finishing of the toes as well as full directions for refooting a sock.

Q – When doing a search for Welsh Heel, this article came up as a hit. I found it quite interesting. In researching old sock knitting patterns, the heels always refer to a “seam stitch”. It appears that pre-knitting-in-the-round, socks would be seamed up at this point. I’ll be discussing the seam stitch in upcoming blogs.

QHave a happy crafty day!

Curls and Q Typealyzer Results or Hahahahahaha!

One of my favorite blogs, Colour Cottage, had a link to Typealyzer which, somehow, analyzes the writing on your blog. Typing in this blog, the results are below. I have bolded the info that fits me. Other parts make me laugh. I am anything but “a smooth operator”. And, I’m always out of the loop for where the action is, even though I do like my brand of fun….. knitting, sewing, crafts, bird watching, etc. These analysis’s are a fun entertainment.

By describing herself, Pia of Colour Cottage is, in fact, describing me! “It also made me wonder whether one can be an extrovert loner. I do enjoy (select) company when I’m in it, and I definitely don’t try to blend with the wallpaper, but I need to recharge my batteries forever afterwards. And I never seem to get hungry for it, I can just potter about alone for weeks if I’m allowed. I simply do not notice that something ought to be missing.”

The analysis results for yesterday’s blog are:

ESTP – The Doers

The author of https://curlsandq.wordpress.com is of the type ESTP.

The active and playful type. They are especially attuned to people and things around them and often full of energy, talking, joking and engaging in physical out-door activities. They are active people who want to solve problems rather than simply discuss them.

ESTPs are the most adept among the types at influencing other people. Promoting is the art of maneuvering others to one’s position. Concrete in speech and utilitarian in action, they are smooth operators. The ESTP knows everyone who matters and everything there is to do because they are very resourceful, always knowing where the fun and action is.

They like to indulge themselves in the finer things in life and to bring other people with them. Their goal in life is to sell themselves and their ideas to others. Dramatic and debonair, they are gifted at earning others’ confidence.

The Doers are happiest with action-filled work which craves their full attention and focus. They might be very impulsive and more keen on starting something new than following it through. They might have a problem with sitting still or remaining inactive for any period of time.

Common satisfying careers: PC Technicians, General Contractor, Building Inspector, Surveyor, Mechanic, Forester, Stockbroker, Real Estate Broker, Police Officer, Firefighter, Athlete, Computer Technical Support

Notable ESTPs: Alexander the great, Winston Churchill, George S. Patton, Donald Trump, Ernest Hemingway, Angelina Jolie, Madonna, Meryl Streep, Jack Nicholson, Julia Roberts, Milla Jovovich, Alfred Hitchcock and Jabba the Hutt.

Sock It To Me Heel Patterns Glossary

Look at the new blog page! I’ve been so enthralled by the different types of knitted sock heels that it’s time to make a glossary so I can quickly look up.

If you know of any other heels or links I should include, PLEASE leave a comment so I can add it to the page.

I know that I don’t have links to all of the toe-up sites, the grandkids have been here since Wed so I’ve had to squeeze this project into the little time I’ve had.

QHave a crafty day!