No More Bouncing Balls

Finished Yarn Ball Holder

Finished Yarn Ball Holders

The Lolo shawlette is an easy, quick knit and I’m loving the project. What I’m not loving is how the yarn balls keep bouncing and twisting, especially when I was sitting in the airport and in the plane. It’s much easier to knit with two balls when you have the luxury of a couch. Although it’s too late for Lolo, I’ve used some of my new knitting-themed fabric to make yarn ball holders. Aren’t they cute? They are ready for my next two-yarn project. If I ever try a three yarn project, I’ll just sew another holder.

These are easy to make.

Materials:
Pattern drafting paper – I have a huge roll of tracing paper purchased at Michael’s
Ruler – I use my long quilting ruler
Main fabric – I used 20 1/2 inches by 12 1/2 inches
Lining fabric – I used 20 1/2 inches by 12 1/2 inches
Iron on interfacing – I cut two 4 inch squares
1/2 wide Velcro – Cut 4  – 1 inch pieces

Pattern on fabric

Pattern on fabric

1. To make the pattern, figure out how wide you want each square, I measured a few of my yarn balls and they were about 4″ in diameter so that’s the figure I used. When teaching earth science, I had the students make models of the different crystal formations, so I adapted that template and adjusted the size for my needs. On pattern paper, you will be making a cross-shape which is 5 squares long by 3 squares wide. Since I based mine on 4″ squares that’s 20″ long by 12″ wide. After drawing that size on the paper I added 1/4″ all around for the seams. That made my pattern 20 1/2 inches long by 12 1/2 inches wide. The quilting ruler is so perfect for this pattern drafting.

2. Lay pattern on fabric and cut out 2 pieces; one main fabric and one lining fabric. Also cut out two squares of iron-on interfacing. It will be used to stabilize the square where the buttonhole will be sewn.

Cut out fabric. Note where interfacing is ironed.

Cut out fabric. Note where interfacing is ironed.

Two 4" Squares of iron-on interfacing

Two 4″ Squares of iron-on interfacing

3. Iron on the interfacing. I forgot to take a picture of this step. Look at the layout picture and see that I’ve noted where the interfacing is to be ironed. It is ironed onto the wrong side of the fabric.

4. Sew up the four side seams on both the main fabric and the lining. Use 1/4 inch seams.

Sew up the four side seams

Sew up the four side seams

Look closely at the top of the box and you can see a bit of the ironed on interfacing.

Pin boxes right sides together

Pin boxes right sides together

5. Pin your boxes right sides together. Sew around using a 1/4 inch seam. Make sure to leave an opening of about 2 inches so you can pull the boxes right sides out. I clipped the seam where the top meets the box, the l-shaped junction. After the box is pulled right side out, sew closed the opening. I ironed the seams the best I could. I am a seam ironer, if you’re not that’s ok.

Pinch sides on the outside and sew a 1/8 inch edging

Pinch sides on the outside and sew a 1/8 inch edging

6. I decided I did not like how “floppy” the square looked so I pinched the sides together, including the main fabric and the lining, and sewed a 1/8 seam. Now the box stands nicely on its own.

Sew a buttonhole

Sew a buttonhole

7. This is the part which took up a lot of my time. I really wanted to try an eyelet or grommet, but after testing quite a few on a waste strip, I decided the “round” buttonhole would work the best. The metal items had bits to snag the yarn. I went around the buttonhole 3 times to make sure it was nice and strong. Cut the buttonhole open.

Attach Velcro closer

Attach Velcro closer

8. Attach the Velcro closer. I have magnetic closers, but since we travel so much I did not want to worry about the magnets attaching to other items or erasing magnetic strip information on cards. (When teaching I threw some neodymium magnets into my purse to bring to school and wiped out the info on my credit cards.) You can see the marks where I measure the middle of the flap and the middle of the bottom square where the flap attaches.

Attach Velcro to the sides of the boxes.

Attach Velcro to the sides of the boxes.

9. Attach Velcro to the sides of each box, the hook on one box and the loop on the other. I folded the side in half both lengthwise and widthwise and made a mark for the middle of the square. Now I can attach both squares together.

Add yarn

Add yarn

10. Add yarn. See how nice and “snuggly” my yarn ball is? Now my yarn holder is all ready for my next two-yarn project.

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