Razzle Dazzle Bins

Razzle Dazzle Bins

Razzle Dazzle Bins

Finished! A comment by Heather, “I pin loads of things and then I’m like: I coulda been makin stuff!”, got me up and sewing. Originally intended for aprons, these Razzle Dazzle prints by Donna Wilder for Fabric Traditions have been sitting in my stash because my mom made aprons for all of us. I’m thinking my sewing studio might be redone using this color pallet. Totally love it! The large one is a perfect size to throw scraps into as I’m cutting out patterns.

There are a few tips for this project:

Using the cutting board to add patterns lines.

Using the cutting board to add patterns lines.

1. Use the cutting board as a “ruler” to help place measurement lines on the pattern. Notice that I added the dimensions onto the pattern.

The fold line is marked with three circles

The fold line is marked with three circles

2. When there is a place on the pattern that is “put on the fold”, make a notation on the pattern using three circles. This is a widely used notation system that our mom, a fabulous seamstress, taught us. It is a quick visual which stands out from all of the writing.

3. Those of you with rotary cutters will probably find it much easier to use that system instead of a pattern, as I did. For a rotary cutter make the following rectangles:

  1. Large size : Cut 16″ by 12″ of main fabric, lining, and pellon
  2. Medium size: Cut 14″ by 11.5″of main fabric, lining, and pellon
  3. Small size: Cut 12″ by 11″ of main fabric, lining, and pellon

From each of the bottom corners of the rectangles:

  1. Large size: Cut out 4″ wide by 3.5″ tall (from fold)
  2. Medium size: Cut out 3.5″ wide by 3″ tall (from fold)
  3. Small size: Cut out 3″ wide by 2.5″ tall (from fold)

Since none of my fabrics were directional, I used a fold and did not add the 1/2 inch at the bottom for seams needed in directional fabrics.

4. I’ve decided that I will not do that extra step in cutting out the bottom indents from each corner. As with the Angry Birds basket, it will go a lot faster if I use the following method for each bottom corner, using Fabric Bin Template:

  1. Sew up the side seams and press them open.
  2. Press the corners flat, so they each form a “triangle”, making sure the side seams matches up with the middle of the bottom piece.
  3. Using the appropriate template, draw a line across the diagonal (long edge) of the triangle template onto the fabric.
  4. Sew across this line and cut off the extra fabric leaving a 1/2 inch of fabric.
  5. Iron the seam open

This will be a much, much faster method and won’t have the “wonky” ends that the cutouts can have.

QEnjoy doing something crafty today!

Lovin’ Swatch Lover

Lovin' Swatch Lover

Lovin’ Swatch Lover

Sewing/Quilting magazines articles on “must haves” for the sewer/quilter are working in this house. Right now I’m making three, same-themed quilts which use 80 different themed fabrics. In order to insure that I get as many different varieties as possible, I needed a good solution. I had seen the Swatch Lover listed as a “must have” in one of the quilting magazines. This has been a wonderful helper when I go to the quilt/fabric store. The tabs are designed so that the fabric swatch goes on one side, and fabric info on the other. To conserve tabs and bulk, I attached fabric swatches to both sides of the tabs. Since all of the fabrics are 100% cotton and come from a wide-variety of fabric companies I’m not worried about collection names, etc. You can see the ring hanging from my Charm Square Holder in the blog picture on Dec. 31, 2014. I attached a binder clip to one of the dividers and hung the ring from it. Easy grab-and-go. The tabs are out of a sturdy plastic and can be re-used, so when I’m done with this project I can remove all of the fabric swatches and start the next project.

QHave a brilliant, crafty day!

Mix-it-up Toddler PJs

Mix-it-Up 3T PJs

Mix-it-Up 3T PJs

Joann’s Fabric did not have enough of the fox flannel to make a complete set of pjs for my daughter’s youngest son. I found a complementary flannel to make Mix-it-up PJs. The top was made from my very favorite McCall’s kid’s pajama pattern: M6227.  I’ve used it for many years, starting when it had a different number. In order to tie the different flannel fabrics of the top together, I turned the facing to the outside. That gave a nicely accented neck trim which matched the sleeves. Using the fox flannel, I added an one inch trim to the end of the sleeves as a tie-in.

The bottoms were made from a free, downloadable pattern I found online at Birch Fabrics Blog. To insure the fit I had my daughter take three measurements (They were in Hawaii and I was here in San Diego):

  1. The rise on a pair of my grandson’s pants.  To measure the rise find a pair of pants that fit and take two measurements: 1. From the crotch seam directly up the front to the top of the waistband and 2. From the crotch seam directly up the back to the top of the waistband (this will be a larger measurement since it includes the butt).
  2. His waist inches
  3. The length from his waist to the floor- outside of leg. I wanted the PJs length longer than his pants.

With those measurements I made the appropriate adaptations to the pattern: increasing both the length and the rise.

Other sewing tips and tricks:

Mark both ends of the elastic

Mark both ends of the elastic

I mark both ends of the elastic before I thread it through the casing. That way I can tell if the elastic becomes twisted through the casing.

Marking the back

Marking the back

I use my finger stamp to show where the back of the pants are. The grandkids have a great visual for putting the pants on the correct way.

Extra facing for buttons

Extra facing for buttons

I used a fusible interfacing to strengthen the “button” area. The button can be lowered as the child grows.

Heart stamp

Heart stamp

The neck back was stamped with a heart and signed “Grandma”. I told the kids I was kissing the back of their necks when the wear the pjs.

QHave a happy, crafting day.