Delightful Handpainted Fiber Surprise

q~Hello My Pretty! I fell in love with this roving the minute I laid eyes on it at Happy Ewe! It is so not colors I wear. What was there about the braid of  85% Polworth Wool/15% Tussah Silk Fiber, color way: Rainbow Bright by Western Sky Knits (WSL) that called my name?

my pretty

As I was undoing the braid, I was overtaken with total amazement. I was expecting the colors of the rainbow because of the Rainbow Bright name: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Keep in mind, I’ve looked at My Pretty every day since purchase AND shared it with the spinning class but never noticed that I’m looking at a color way in the print color wheel!

Watch out, my science brain is taking over! There are 3 main types of color models/wheels which have different primary colors; dye, print and light. I taught this for 23 years but never had it “hit-me-in-the-face” before.

brief description of each without all of the vocabulary and science which usually accompanies a lesson.

1. Most of use are familiar with the dye color model/wheel we learned about in elementary school which has the primary colors of  red, blue, and yellow. Combining the primary colors give us the secondary colors of red + yellow = orange; yellow + blue = green; blue + red = purple.

2. On the printed page the colors we see are based on tiny little dots so close together that our eyes blend them together into colors. This is based on the CMYK color model: cyan (C), magenta (M), yellow (Y) and black (K). Get a magnifying glass and look at the Sunday comics, easy to see the dots. The primary colors of print are: cyan (C), magenta (M), and yellow (Y).  The secondary colors obtained by mixing the primary colors are not exactly the same as the secondary colors of dye, but create values of the colors: Magenta + yellow = orange; yellow + blue = yellow green; blue + magenta = purple. Combine all colors to get black, the black isn’t a true black that’s why real black is added. Think of the color cartridges you purchase for your color printer.

3. The colors emitted by a light source which go straight into our eyes; for example TVs, computer screens, stage lights are based on adding light together. The primary colors of light are red, blue and green. The secondary colors are red + blue = cyan; blue + green = yellow (yes, yellow); green + red = magenta. If all three primary colors are projected at a single spot, white light results. Next time you’re at a play, notice that all of the footlights are either red, blue, or green. The lights are combined to make different colored spotlights; including white.

So, when I unbraided My Pretty, much to my delight I noticed that the CMYK color model was used to produce the color way: magenta, orange, yellow, yellow-green, aqua, purple and black. And, as expected the black is not a true black it’s more of a very, very, dark, midnight blue. Here is My Pretty folded into a CMYK color model: Magenta, orange, yellow, yellow-green, aqua, purple, and black. Very clever dyer! Now it’s time to get to the wheel and have some fun!

cmyk

Home Full of Love – Curls

– The best thing about having a creative family is the love you see in every creation they have made. Q and my homes are filled with this love that we feel every time we look at them.

In my guest bathroom, I have a few small wall hangings that grandma made and a plaster of paris art work that I made in high school.

        

My breakfast nook has a floral cross stitch that I did. This is my favorite one. It took about two years to stitch. The teapot is done by my mother. She gave me the tea pot to go with the picture. The doily is done by my great aunt Mable, grandma’s sister. The two Crabby Patties are made out of play dough by my two older grandchildren, Baylie and Gavin.

This cross stitch is hung over my kitchen sink. It is one of my first cross stitch projects. I sign all of my projects, usually, in the lower right hand corner.

  

In my living room are so many had crafted items, it was hard to choose which ones to spotlight. The pillow on the left was done by dad. He made one for Q too. He was very crafty. He could fix just about anything. He enjoyed working with his hands. He got into beading and made some wonderful necklaces. One of his tips was published in Beading. The hand stitched lace, on the end table, was done by great-aunt Mable. I have tried to crochet lace like this but the hand work was too small for me to do. The cross stitch flower, on the wall,  was done by my husband’s step-grandmother Katie (close up below). The wall hanging on the right was done by grandma. Grandma did not do the “conventional” type of needlework, her items were pieces of art. Oh, the settee belonged to my great-grandparents. It also has a place of honor in my home!

           

                   

The TV room is where I work. My husband’s chair is on the left and is draped with the blanket that I made for him. It has old time RV and travel trailers on it. Q gave me the material for my yellow ducky blanket, it was the first one I made. I love yellow, rubber duckies. I have since  made one for all of the grand-children. See the basket next to my chair, my knitting projects are in the basket. The green felted bag, I made, has my Wreck This Journal plus pens and supplies in it.  The spinning wheel corner has another cross stitch I made for my husband and another hanging done by grandma. Grandma LOVE to make this type of wall hanging.  All of us grandchildren have some. The spinning wheel was hand crafted in Norway. It was made for the new home in America. Great-grandma Slette brought it over.

           

This is the toy cross stitch I made for my husband. He loves toys. The four duck picture was drawn by youngest son, in high school. All the duck’s beaks are colored yellow except one, so I told him that was me. The only female in the family. The ceramics were made by oldest boy, in high school and the colored eggs  by my youngest. There use to be five. 😦

The master bedroom has my only quilt that I have ever finished, so far. It is the pattern “Turning Twenty”, by Tricia Cribbs. The crochet afghan was crochet by grandma. The wall hanging was quilted by sister Terri.

          

The end table is an old sewing table with the singer sewing machine still inside. On the table is another lace cover done by great-aunt Mable. She did such fab work. Closeup picture below.

         

The Peter Rabbit wall hanging was done by sister Terri.  It hangs in the grand-children’s room. The quest bedroom’s bathroom has a wall hanging done by grandma. Sitting on the toilet is a small creation done by her, also.

Hope you all have enjoyed looking at a small example of the wonderful creations that surround me everyday. Q and I have started early with our grand-children teaching them how to be creative.

Fabulous Fractal Fiber

 Mariah was yelling at me this morning – spin, spin, spin.  Ok, time to do my spinning “homework”.  Spinning class starts again tomorrow.  It’s through Grossmont Adult School and the teacher is Margaret.  One homework assignment last term was to make a fractal yarn.  At the time I didn’t have a wheel and to be honest I never mastered the drop spindle.  So today is the day!!! Knitty has a great article on “Fractal Spinning“.  This is the yarn sample I’m going to work with.

Take the sample and divide in half.  Noting which color you start with, spin 1/2 of the yarn.

This is the first half which is spun onto the bobbin.

Next divide the second half into four equal pieces.

Start spinning with the same color as you used for the first half.  Keep adding the other pieces with the colors in the same order.  Below is my final project after plying, winding on the nitty noddy, and twisting.  Please don’t judge too harshly.  Remember, I’m a new spinner and this is only the second time I’ve tried plying!  The yarn is beautiful!  All the ends are the extra unplied yarn I used to tie the skein together.

Spinning class tomorrow, so it will be a late post.  for the rest of the day, I have to sew a carrier for Mariah.  Sewing time!